Philadelphia and the Countryside - Press Room

Releases: Expanded View

Dec 5 2012

Enjoy Your Own Silver Lining In Philadelphia

Itinerary Inspired By Bradley Cooper’s Oscar-Nominated Film Silver Linings Playbook

LOCATION: Center City, Philadelphia; South Philadelphia; and the suburbs

TRANSPORTATION: By foot in Center City; by taxi, Septa or car for locations beyond

TIME: An overnight

SUMMARY: Featured on visitphilly.com/itineraries, this jaunt takes visitors to many of the spots featured and mentioned in Philadelphia native Bradley Cooper’s hit film, Silver Linings Playbook. (These sites are bolded throughout the itinerary.)

ITINERARY:

Day One:
12:00 noon
– Ballroom at the Ben doesn’t appear in the Silver Linings Playbook until Pat’s and Tiffany’s dramatic dance competition scene at the end of the movie, but you can start your trip to Philadelphia with a buffet lunch at the building’s Palace at the Ben, giving the spicy, rich curries of Northern India a stunning ambiance without compromising their authenticity.

1:30 p.m. – After lunch, swing around the corner to Jewelers’ Row just as Pat and Tiffany did in the movie. Here you’ll find a dizzying selection of sparkle and bling—custom designed jewelry, hand-cut gems, one-of-a-kind estate pieces and other adornments—at more than 300 diamond and jewelry merchants.

3:00 p.m. – Once you’ve done your share of shopping, plan to get your history on by exploring some of the many Benjamin Franklin sites and memorials found in the city’s Old City neighborhood. (These sites aren’t in the movie, but Ben is lauded by Pat Sr., who says that Franklin is more American than a cowboy—the mascot of the Philadelphia Eagles’ rival Dallas Cowboys.)

  • Have your postcards hand-stamped at the B. Free Franklin Post Office, and then head upstairs to the U.S. Postal Service Museum, which explains Franklin’s role as the nation’s first Postmaster General.
  • Steps away at the Print Shop, Franklin’s career as a printer is demonstrated using 18th-century printing techniques and machinery. As you walk through the archway leading to the Ghost Structure, designed by architect Robert Venturi to commemorate the place where Franklin’s home stood, you’ll be following in Franklin’s daily footsteps.

7:30 p.m. – If the timing of your trip is right, you can end your night with a Philadanco performance. This renowned dance troupe appears on a poster in Tiffany’s in-home dance studio, and they perform at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts each spring and fall. Every other weekend of the year, the Kimmel’s other resident companies and visiting artists take the stage.

10:00 p.m. – Grab a bite to eat or drink after the show (or before if you prefer), where acclaimed Garces Catering has recently taken over operations, or make a reservation at one of the many restaurants—Bliss, XIX (Nineteen), Estia, for starters—on or around the Avenue of the Arts.

Day Two:
10:30 a.m.
– The Philadelphia skyline is featured prominently in the Silver Linings Playbook, and the tallest of those buildings is the Comcast Center, a 57-floor building that’s also the greenest in the country. Start your day with a viewing of The Comcast Experience, depicting realistic nature imagery, urban landscapes and much more on the largest four-millimeter LED screen in the world.

10:45 a.m. – After you’ve stood in awe of this super-sized screen, head downstairs to The Market & Shops for breakfast or lunch at some of Philly’s favorite eateries, such as Di Bruno Bros., Termini Brothers Bakery and more.

11:30 a.m. – Once you’ve eaten, hail a cab or hop in your car and head south to the Philadelphia Eagles’ Lincoln Financial Field, featured prominently in the film. While it’s difficult to score tickets for a game, tours of the field are available year-round and include stops at the pressroom, the field, the locker room and more. Before leaving the stadium, stop in the Philadelphia Eagles Pro Shop to pick up a DeSean Jackson #10 jersey similar to the one one Pat wore in the film or a green cardigan sweater like the fanatical Pat Sr. sported. Another great spot to buy authentic football jerseys? Mitchell & Ness, a haven for sports fans in Center City, Philadelphia that carries official reproductions of uniforms worn by professional baseball, basketball and football players, plus T-shirts, hats and other goods.

2:00 p.m. – If you can’t leave town without sitting in the booth where Pat and Tiffany had their first non-date on Halloween night, then head northwest of the city to the Llanerch Diner. This 80-plus-year-old Upper Darby institution serves up your standard diner fare, along with Greek specialties such as moussaka, pastitsio and spinach pie, 24/7.


ADDRESS BOOK

Ballroom at the Ben
834 Chestnut Street

Palace at the Ben
834 Chestnut Street
(267) 232-5600, thepalaceattheben.com

Jewelers’ Row
Between 7th & 8th Streets and Chestnut & Walnut Streets

Franklin Court, Ghost Structure
318 Market Street
(215) 965-2305, nps.gov/inde

B. Free Franklin Post Office
316 Market Street
(215) 965-2305, nps.gov/inde

Print Shop
320 Market Street
(215) 965-2305, nps.gov/inde

Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts
300 S. Broad Street
(215) 893-1999, kimmelcenter.org

Bliss
220 S. Broad Street
(215) 731-1100, bliss-restaurant.com

XIX (Nineteen)
Hyatt at The Bellevue
Broad & Walnut Streets, 19th floor
(215) 790-1919, nineteenrestaurant.com

Estia
1405 Locust Street
(215) 735-7700, estiarestaurant.com

Comcast Center
17th Street & John F. Kennedy Boulevard
visitphilly.com/comcast, themarketandshopsatcomcastcenter.com

Lincoln Financial Field
11th Street & Pattison Avenue
(215) 463-5500, lincolnfinancialfield.com

Mitchell & Ness
1201 Chestnut Street (enter on 12th Street)
(267) 273-7622, mitchellandness.com

Llanerch Diner
95 E. Township Line Road, Upper Darby
(610) 789-6057, llanerchdiner.com

The Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation (GPTMC) makes Philadelphia and The Countryside® a premier destination through marketing and image building that increases business and promotes the region’s vitality.

For more information about travel to Philadelphia, visit visitphilly.com or uwishunu.com, where you can build itineraries; search event calendars; see photos and videos; view interactive maps; sign up for newsletters; listen to HearPhilly, an online radio station about what to see and do in the region; book hotel reservations and more. Or, call the Independence Visitor Center, located in Historic Philadelphia, at (800) 537-7676.

Contact(s):
  • E-mail

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