Philadelphia and the Countryside - Press Room

Releases: Expanded View

Sep 30 2015

Bucks County: Bristol

Founded in 1681, the town of Bristol, Pennsylvania boasts a long and proud history. Located on the banks of the Delaware River, Bristol served an important role in both the Revolutionary and Civil wars, and at one time it was a major textile-milling center. The old-world influence still exists today, as evidenced by the town’s many antique shops, historic mansions and significant landmarks.

History:
Along the riverfront, several statues pay tribute to such icons as Christopher Columbus and Harriet Tubman. Two other important figures for the town: textile-milling tycoon Joseph R. Grundy and his sister and library advocate Margaret R. Grundy, who is honored by the Margaret R. Grundy Memorial Library and the Margaret R. Grundy Memorial Museum. The latter showcases an impressive collection of authentic Victorian-era décor and furniture, and free, guided tours are offered Tuesday through Thursday and on Saturday.

Its Main Street:
A mix of independently owned restaurants and shops defines Mill Street. This charming stretch runs through the center of town, all the way down to the shores of the Delaware River.

Arts & Culture:
Since 1986, Bristol Riverside Theatre, a community-oriented non-profit theater company, has produced performances of classic productions such as Man of La Mancha and Neil Simon’s Rumors. Comedy Works Bristol at Georgine’s restaurant showcases some of the country’s best standup comics on Friday and Saturday nights, as well as on special occasions. Aspiring artists can explore their creative side over cocktails at The Art-Tini Studio, a bring-your-own-bottle painting space that offers public classes and private parties.

The Great Outdoors:
Outdoor enthusiasts love Silver Lake Nature Center, featuring a butterfly garden, lakes, marshes, meadows, a bog and 4.5 miles of nature trails that highlight the diverse plant and animal life in the area. The Bristol Waterfront Park provides a tranquil oasis for fishing and walking along the river.

Food & Drink:
The historic King George II Inn dates back to 1681 and has welcomed notable guests such as Gregory Peck, Katherine Hepburn and even George Washington. The Golden Eagle Diner and Restaurant specializes in home-style dishes that incorporate local fruits, vegetables and other fresh ingredients.

Shops, Shops, Shops:
On Mill Street, Another Time Antiques sells items from the past, including art, jewelry, furniture and glassware. Locals have frequented the family-owned Mignoni Jewelry for its assortment of fine jewelry, imported Irish gifts, dolls and figurines since 1947. Around the corner, lifestyle shop Spice & Co. carries oils, vinegars, coffee, tea, spa products and home goods.

Events & Festivals:
The longest-running exhibition of antique cars in the country, the Antique Auto Show attracts car enthusiasts on the first Sunday in May. On the First Friday of every month from June through September, businesses in the historic Bristol shopping district stay open late and offer discounts, specials and giveaways. Summer brings several ethnic celebrations: Celtic Heritage Festival, Puerto Rican Day Festival, Afro-American Day Festival and Italian Day Festival. In September, the Doo-Wop Festival, Bristol’s largest festival, brings a day full of 1950s music. And every October, Historic Bristol Day features a family-friendly street fair packed with arts and crafts, food vendors and entertainers, children’s games and a sailing regatta.

Getting There:
Driving the 25 miles from Center City Philadelphia to Bristol takes roughly 35 minutes. Metered street parking and municipal lots are available. SEPTA operates a station in Bristol, but getting there from Philadelphia requires several rail and bus transfers.

Where To Stay:

  • Ramada Levittown Bucks County, 6201 Bristol Pike, Levittown, (215) 946-1100, ramada.com

VISIT PHILADELPHIA® makes Philadelphia and The Countryside® a premier destination through marketing and image building that increases the number of visitors, the number of nights they stay and the number of things they do in the five-county area.

On Greater Philadelphia’s official visitor website and blog, visitphilly.com and uwishunu.com, visitors can explore things to do, upcoming events, themed itineraries and hotel packages. Compelling photography and videos, interactive maps and detailed visitor information make the sites effective trip-planning tools. Along with Visit Philly social media channels, the online platforms communicate directly with consumers. Travelers can also call and stop into the Independence Visitor Center for additional information and tickets.

Contact(s):
  • E-mail

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